UFC 68 The Uprising

UFC 68 – The Uprising

UFC 68 – The Uprising

UFC 68 The Uprising

UFC 68

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 68: The Uprising was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on March 3, 2007 at the Nationwide Arena in Columbus, Ohio.

UFC 68 was the first UFC event held in the state of Ohio, and coincided with the 2007 Arnold Sports Festival. The sold-out event produced the highest verifiable live attendance to date for a mixed martial arts event in North America with 19,079 spectators.[3] At the time it was the largest attendance for a MMA event in the United States.

In the main event, UFC Heavyweight Champion Tim Sylvia was set to defend his title against Randy Couture, who was coming out of a 12-month retirement. Couture, a former UFC Heavyweight and Light Heavyweight Champion, hadn’t fought as a heavyweight since UFC 39 in 2002.

Also featured at UFC 68 were the return bouts of former champions Matt Hughes at welterweight and Rich Franklin at middleweight.[4]

Results SPOILER

Main card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Heavyweight Randy Couture def. Tim Sylvia (c) Decision (unanimous) (50–45, 50–45, 50–45) 5 5:00 [a]
Middleweight Martin Kampmann def. Drew McFedries Technical Submission (arm-triangle choke) 1 4:06
Middleweight Rich Franklin def. Jason MacDonald TKO (corner stoppage) 2 5:00 [b]
Welterweight Matt Hughes def. Chris Lytle Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Light Heavyweight Jason Lambert def. Renato Sobral KO (punch) 2 3:36
Preliminary card
Light Heavyweight Matt Hamill def. Rex Holman TKO (punches) 1 4:00
Welterweight Jon Fitch def. Luigi Fioravanti Submission (rear-naked choke) 2 3:05
Lightweight Gleison Tibau def. Jason Dent Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Lightweight Jamie Varner def. Jason Gilliam Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 1:34
UFC 67 All or Nothing

UFC 67 – All or Nothing

UFC 67 – All or Nothing

UFC 67 All or Nothing

UFC 67

part 1

part 2

HISTORY

UFC 67: All or Nothing was a mixed martial arts event held by Ultimate Fighting Championship. The event was held Saturday, February 3, 2007 at the Mandalay Bay Events Center on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada. It was also the first UFC pay-per-view broadcast in High-Definition.

This event was the first UFC pay-per-view event since UFC 60 to have no championship bouts on the card. In the main event, the middleweight winner of The Ultimate Fighter 4, Travis Lutter was scheduled to challenge middleweight champion Anderson Silva for the middleweight title, however he was not able to make weight and the fight was changed to a non-title contest.[5]

The welterweight winner of The Ultimate Fighter 4, Matt Serra, was also scheduled to challenge the welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre. However, St.-Pierre injured a knee during training and the bout was postponed.[6]

Two former PRIDE stars made their debuts in the UFC at this event. 2006 PRIDE Open-Weight Grand Prix Champion Mirko Filipović made his debut in the United States and in the UFC at UFC 67 against Eddie Sanchez.[7][8]

Quinton Jackson — whose contract was acquired by the UFC after Zuffa’s buyout of the World Fighting Alliance — made his debut against Marvin Eastman, whose contract with the WFA was also bought by Zuffa. Eastman has an early win over Jackson in the KOTC promotion.[9] It was also the UFC debut of future Light Heavyweight Champion, Lyoto Machida and also the debut of the future Lightweight Champion Frankie Edgar.

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Middleweight Anderson Silva def. Travis Lutter Submission (triangle choke with elbows)[10] 2 2:11 [a]
Heavyweight Mirko Filipovic def. Eddie Sanchez TKO (punches) 1 4:33
Light Heavyweight Quinton Jackson def. Marvin Eastman KO (punches) 2 3:49
Lightweight Roger Huerta def. John Halverson TKO (punches) 1 0:18
Middleweight Patrick Côté def. Scott Smith Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Preliminary card
Middleweight Terry Martin def. Jorge Rivera KO (punches) 1 0:14 [b]
Lightweight Frankie Edgar def. Tyson Griffin Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 29–28, 30–27) 3 5:00 [c]
Light Heavyweight Lyoto Machida def. Sam Hoger Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Lightweight Dustin Hazelett def. Diego Saraiva Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
UFC 66: Liddell vs. Ortiz

UFC 66 – Liddell vs. Ortiz

UFC 66 – Liddell vs. Ortiz

UFC 66: Liddell vs. Ortiz

UFC 66

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 66: Liddell vs. Ortiz was a mixed martial arts (MMA) pay-per-view event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on December 30, 2006 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada.

UFC 66′s main event was a championship fight with two of the UFC’s biggest light heavyweight stars, Light Heavyweight Champion Chuck Liddell defending his title against former champion Tito Ortiz. This fight was first announced by Ortiz at the UFC 63 weigh-ins on September 22, 2006.[4]

The co-main event saw Forrest Griffin take on “The Dean of Mean” Keith Jardine. The card also saw the return of former Heavyweight Champion Andrei Arlovski and The Ultimate Fighter 3 winner Michael Bisping’s first bout in the UFC since winning that season. During the event, it was made official that Mirko “Cro Cop” Filipovic had signed a contract with the UFC, and would make his debut with the organization at UFC 67.[5]

The event was the UFC’s first show at MGM Grand Arena since UFC 56, and was nearly sold-out, producing the highest live gate revenue in North American mixed martial arts history,[1] extending the previous record at UFC 57 by over $2,000,000 (USD). At the time, it was estimated to be the UFC’s biggest pay-per-view success with just over 1 million buys.[6]

The disclosed fighter payroll for the event was $767,000.[3]

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Light Heavyweight Chuck Liddell (c) def. Tito Ortiz TKO (punches) 3 3:59 [a]
Light Heavyweight Keith Jardine def. Forrest Griffin TKO (punches) 1 4:41
Middleweight Jason MacDonald def. Chris Leben Technical Submission (guillotine choke) 2 4:03
Heavyweight Andrei Arlovski def. Marcio Cruz KO (punches) 1 3:15
Light Heavyweight Michael Bisping def. Eric Schafer TKO (punches) 1 4:24
Preliminary Card
Welterweight Thiago Alves def. Tony DeSouza KO (knee) 2 1:10 [b]
Heavyweight Gabriel Gonzaga def. Carmelo Marrero Submission (armbar) 1 3:22 [c]
Middleweight Yushin Okami def. Rory Singer Submission (punches) 3 4:03
Heavyweight Christian Wellisch def. Anthony Perosh Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 29–27, 29–28) 3 5:00
UFC 65 Bad Intentions

UFC 65 – Bad Intentions

UFC 65 – Bad Intentions

UFC 65 Bad Intentions

UFC 65

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 65: Bad Intentions was a mixed martial arts competition held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on November 18, 2006 at the ARCO Arena in Sacramento, California – the UFC’s first show at this venue. It was broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States and Canada, and was later released on DVD.

The card featured the anticipated rematch between Matt Hughes and Georges St-Pierre for the UFC Welterweight Championship – a fight originally scheduled for UFC 63. UFC 65 also featured a heavyweight title bout between Undisputed UFC Heavyweight Champion Tim Sylvia and Jeff Monson.

This event marked one of the few occasions that a UFC card with two non-interim title fights featured the lower weight class’ title fight as the card’s main event. The UFC had stated afterwards that all cards with two title fights will always have the heavier weight class’ title fight as the main event. UFC 169 on February 1st, 2014 would later feature two non-interim title fights, with the lighter weight class as main event. [4]

UFC 65′s original slated main event was a championship superfight with UFC Light Heavyweight Champion Chuck Liddell defending his title against PRIDE Middleweight Champion Wanderlei Silva, a matchup UFC President Dana White announced during UFC 61 on July 8, 2006. Since then, the matchup appeared to have been postponed or cancelled because Tito Ortiz had been guaranteed a title shot at UFC 66, which was too close to UFC 65, as White stated in several interviews.[5]

The Hughes vs. St-Pierre main event was long awaited. It was first officially announced to happen at UFC 63 during the July 17, 2006 edition of the The Hot List on ESPNEWS. The fight was announced before, without a date, at a press conference in Toronto, Canada on April 7, 2006, and the matchup was alluded to—but not officially announced—during the pay-per-view broadcast of UFC 58.[6]

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Welterweight Georges St. Pierre def. Matt Hughes (c) TKO (head kick and punches) 2 1:25 [a]
Heavyweight Tim Sylvia (c) def. Jeff Monson Decision (unanimous) (49–46, 50–45, 49–46) 5 5:00 [b]
Light Heavyweight Drew McFedries def. Alessio Sakara TKO (punches) 1 4:07 [c]
Heavyweight Brandon Vera def. Frank Mir TKO (punches) 1 1:09
Lightweight Joe Stevenson def. Dokonjonosuke Mishima Submission (guillotine choke) 1 2:07
Preliminary Card
Welterweight Nick Diaz def. Gleison Tibau TKO (punches) 2 2:27
Heavyweight Antoni Hardonk def. Sherman Pendergarst KO (leg kick) 1 3:15 [d]
Light Heavyweight James Irvin def. Hector Ramirez TKO (punch and elbows) 2 2:36 [e]
Heavyweight Jake O’Brien def. Josh Schockman Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
UFC 64 Unstoppable

UFC 64 – Unstoppable

UFC 64 – Unstoppable

UFC 64 Unstoppable

UFC 64

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 64: Unstoppable was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on Saturday, October 14, 2006. The event took place at the Mandalay Bay Events Center, on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada and was broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States and Canada.

The card centered on a UFC Middleweight Championship defense by Rich Franklin against highly touted Anderson Silva. It was also Franklin’s first defense in 7 months.

The card also featured a UFC Lightweight Championship bout between The Ultimate Fighter alumnus Kenny Florian and longtime UFC veteran Sean Sherk. It was the first Lightweight Championship bout since UFC 41 in 2003, when B.J. Penn and Caol Uno fought to a draw.

A planned match between Keith Jardine and Mike Nickels was cancelled a day before the event when Nickels reaggravated a previous back injury sustained during training. A replacement could not be found on short notice.[4]

Clay Guida made his UFC debut at this event.

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Middleweight Anderson Silva def. Rich Franklin (c) TKO (knee) 1 2:59 [a]
Lightweight Sean Sherk def. Kenny Florian Decision (unanimous) (49–46, 49–46, 50–48) 5 5:00 [b]
Welterweight Jon Fitch def. Kuniyoshi Hironaka Decision (unanimous) (30–25, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Heavyweight Carmelo Marrero def. Cheick Kongo Decision (split) (29–28, 28–29, 29–28) 3 5:00
Lightweight Spencer Fisher def. Dan Lauzon TKO (punches) 1 4:38
Preliminary Card
Middleweight Yushin Okami def. Kalib Starnes TKO (punches) 3 1:40
Lightweight Clay Guida def. Justin James Submission (rear-naked choke) 2 4:42 [c]
Lightweight Kurt Pellegrino def. Júnior Assunção Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 2:04
UFC 63 Hughes vs. Penn

UFC 63 – Hughes vs. Penn

UFC 63 – Hughes vs. Penn

UFC 63 Hughes vs. Penn

UFC 63

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 63: Hughes vs. Penn was a mixed martial arts (MMA) event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on September 23, 2006. The event took place at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim, California and was broadcast live on pay-per-view (PPV) in the United States and Canada.

The event, originally subtitled “Hughes vs. St-Pierre,” was scheduled to feature a UFC Welterweight Title match between champion Matt Hughes and Georges St-Pierre. Nevertheless, a groin injury—which was reported early in August, forced St-Pierre off the card. At first, St-Pierre sought a physiotherapist, hoping the injury would heal on its own during training;[4] however, it was later announced that St-Pierre would indeed withdraw from his long-awaited title shot. Taking his place was former UFC Welterweight Champion, B.J. Penn, who defeated Hughes in a championship fight in 2004, and was beaten by St-Pierre at UFC 58. In fact, the Penn loss was Hughes’ only defeat in his last twenty fights.

The Quad-City Times reported that Pat Miletich expressed outrage that the UFC had apparently scheduled this event alongside a bout he had forthcoming in the IFL, which caused him to miss cornering Hughes and Pulver, fighters whom he coaches, in their UFC matches.[5]

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Welterweight Matt Hughes (c) def. B.J. Penn TKO (punches) 3 3:53 [a]
Middleweight Mike Swick def. David Loiseau Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 29–28, 29–28) 3 5:00
Lightweight Melvin Guillard def. Gabe Ruediger TKO (punch to the body) 2 1:01
Light Heavyweight Rashad Evans def. Jason Lambert KO (punches) 2 2:22
Lightweight Joe Lauzon def. Jens Pulver TKO (punch) 1 0:48
Preliminary Card
Lightweight Roger Huerta def. Jason Dent Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00 [b]
Heavyweight Eddie Sanchez def. Mario Neto KO (punches) 2 0:17
Lightweight Jorge Gurgel def. Danny Abbadi Decision (split) (28–29, 29–28, 29–28) 3 5:00 [c]
Lightweight Tyson Griffin def. David Lee Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 1:50
UFC 62 Liddell vs. Sobral

UFC 62 – Liddell vs. Sobral

UFC 62 – Liddell vs. Sobral

UFC 62 Liddell vs. Sobral

UFC 62

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 62: Liddell vs. Sobral was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on August 26, 2006. The event took place at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas, Nevada and was broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States and Canada.

The main event featured a UFC Light Heavyweight Championship between Chuck Liddell and Renato Sobral. The co-main event was a TUF rematch between Forrest Griffin and Stephan Bonnar.

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Light Heavyweight Chuck Liddell (c) def. Renato Sobral TKO (punches) 1 1:35 [a]
Light Heavyweight Forrest Griffin def. Stephan Bonnar Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00 [b]
Welterweight Nick Diaz def. Josh Neer Submission (kimura) 3 1:42 [c]
Heavyweight Cheick Kongo def. Christian Wellisch KO (knee) 1 2:51
Lightweight Hermes Franca def. Jamie Varner Submission (armbar) 3 3:31 [d]
Preliminary Card
Light Heavyweight Eric Schafer def. Rob MacDonald Technical Submission (arm-triangle choke) 1 2:26 [e]
Light Heavyweight Wilson Gouveia def. Wes Combs Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 3:23 [f]
Light Heavyweight David Heath def. Cory Walmsley Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 2:32
Middleweight Yushin Okami def. Alan Belcher Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
UFC 61 Bitter Rivals

UFC 61 – Bitter Rivals

UFC 61 – Bitter Rivals

UFC 61 Bitter Rivals

UFC 61

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 61: Bitter Rivals was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on Saturday, July 8, 2006. The event took place at the Mandalay Bay Events Center, in Las Vegas, Nevada and was broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States.

The main event was a Heavyweight Championship match between champion Tim Sylvia and former champion Andrei Arlovski. This was the third time these fighters had met, they had split the first two meetings. The co-main event was the highly anticipated rematch of TUF 3 coaches Tito Ortiz and Ken Shamrock.

It was announced during the event that Chuck Liddell would fight PRIDE star Wanderlei Silva in November if Liddell won his upcoming match against Renato “Babalu” Sobral at UFC 62. Negotiations between the UFC and PRIDE failed however and the Liddell-Silva fight never occurred in November 2006. The two would eventually meet in December 2007 at UFC 79.

The number of pay-per-view buys for UFC 61 in the United States was approximately 775,000, which set a new UFC buyrate record and generated gross PPV revenue of approximately $30,960,000. The disclosed fighter payroll for the event was $676,000. With a live gate at $3,350,775, it nearly eclipsed the all-time mark for UFC events set at UFC 57.

Results: SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Heavyweight Tim Sylvia (c) def. Andrei Arlovski Decision (unanimous) (48–47, 49–46, 48–47) 5 5:00 [a]
Welterweight Josh Burkman def. Josh Neer Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 30–27, 29–28) 3 5:00
Light Heavyweight Tito Ortiz def. Ken Shamrock TKO (elbows) 1 1:18
Heavyweight Frank Mir def. Dan Christison Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 29–28, 29–28) 3 5:00
Lightweight Joe Stevenson def. Yves Edwards TKO (doctor stoppage) 2 5:00
Preliminary Card
Catchweight (165 lb) Hermes França def. Joe Jordan Submission (triangle choke) 3 0:47 [b]
Heavyweight Jeff Monson def. Anthony Perosh TKO (punches) 1 2:42
Heavyweight Cheick Kongo def. Gilbert Aldana TKO (doctor stoppage) 1 4:13
Welterweight Drew Fickett def. Kurt Pellegrino Submission (rear-naked choke) 3 1:20
UFC 60 Hughes vs. Gracie

UFC 60 – Hughes vs. Gracie

UFC 60 – Hughes vs. Gracie

UFC 60 Hughes vs. Gracie

UFC 60

part 1

part 2

UFC 60: Hughes vs. Gracie was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on May 27, 2006.[2] The event took place at the Staples Center, in Los Angeles, California and was broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States and Canada.

Headlining the card was a non-title catchweight (175 lb) match between then-current UFC Welterweight Champion Matt Hughes, and UFC Hall of Famer Royce Gracie, the winner of UFC 1, UFC 2 and UFC 4. This was Gracie’s first match in the UFC and in the United States since UFC 5.

The event drew 620,000 buys, becoming the best-selling pay-per-view in UFC history up to that point, and the first to break the $20 million mark in gross PPV sales.[3]

Results: SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Catchweight (175 lb) Matt Hughes def. Royce Gracie TKO (punches) 1 4:39
Light Heavyweight Dean Lister def. Alessio Sakara Submission (triangle choke) 1 2:20
Welterweight Diego Sanchez def. John Alessio Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 29–28, 29–28) 3 5:00
Heavyweight Brandon Vera def. Assuerio Silva Submission (guillotine choke) 1 2:39
Middleweight Mike Swick def. Joe Riggs Submission (guillotine choke) 1 2:19
Preliminary Card
Middleweight Jeremy Horn def. Chael Sonnen Submission (armbar) 2 1:17 [a]
Lightweight Spencer Fisher def. Matt Wiman KO (flying knee) 2 1:43 [b]
Heavyweight Gabriel Gonzaga def. Fabiano Scherner TKO (punches) 2 0:24
Lightweight Melvin Guillard def. Rick Davis KO (punch) 1 1:37
UFC 59 Reality Check

UFC 59 – Reality Check

UFC 59 – Reality Check

UFC 59 Reality Check

UFC 59

part 1

part 2


UFC 59: Reality Check was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on April 15, 2006 at Arrowhead Pond, in Anaheim, California, and broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States and Canada.

This was the first-ever UFC event held in California after the state’s legalization of mixed martial arts contests. It was a sold-out show, and was one of the fastest sell outs in UFC history.

According to the California State Athletic Commission, there were 13,060 tickets sold, with a live gate of $2,191,450. The disclosed fighter payroll for the event was $539,000. [3]

RESULTS SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Heavyweight Tim Sylvia def. Andrei Arlovski (c) TKO (punches) 1 2:43 [a]
Welterweight Sean Sherk def. Nick Diaz Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Light Heavyweight Tito Ortiz def. Forrest Griffin Decision (split) (30–27, 28–29, 29–27) 3 5:00
Middleweight Evan Tanner def. Justin Levens Submission (triangle choke) 1 3:14 [b]
Heavyweight Jeff Monson def. Marcio Cruz Decision (split) (30–27, 29–28, 28–29) 3 5:00
Preliminary Card
Welterweight Karo Parisyan def. Nick Thompson Submission (punches) 1 4:44
Middleweight David Terrell def. Scott Smith Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 3:08
Light Heavyweight Jason Lambert def. Terry Martin TKO (punches) 2 2:37 [c]
Welterweight Thiago Alves def. Derrick Noble TKO (punches) 1 2:54 [d]
  1.  For the UFC Heavyweight Championship.
  2. Levens replaced Jeremy Horn, who dropped out due to a back injury sustained during training.
  3.  This was a preliminary fight that did not air on the pay-per-view broadcast.
  4.  This was a preliminary fight that did not air on the pay-per-view broadcast.
UFC 200 Tate vs. Nunes

UFC 200 – Tate vs. Nunes

UFC 200 – Tate vs. Nunes

UFC 200 Tate vs. Nunes

UFC 200

UFC 200 – Tate vs. Nunes – Preliminary Fights

part 1

part 2

UFC 200 – Tate vs. Nunes – Main Event

 UFC 200 part 1

UFC 200 part 2


HISTORY

UFC 200: Tate vs. Nunes was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship held on July 9, 2016, at the T-Mobile Arena on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada.[4]

It was the final UFC event under Zuffa ownership, which began in January 2001. The company subsequently announced its sale to WME-IMG, an American talent agency with offices in Beverly Hills.[5]

The event was the first that the organization has hosted at T-Mobile Arena, which opened in April 2016.[4] It took place during the UFC’s annual International Fight Week and marked the second time the UFC hosted three events in consecutive days.

A welterweight rematch between The Ultimate Fighter 5 winner and former lightweight title challenger Nate Diaz and current UFC Featherweight Champion Conor McGregor was originally expected to headline the event.[6][7]The pairing previously met earlier in the year at UFC 196. McGregor was expected to challenge UFC Lightweight Champion Rafael dos Anjos, but dos Anjos pulled out due to a broken foot only 11 days before the event. Diaz eventually replaced him and the bout was shifted to the welterweight division.[8] Diaz won the fight via rear-naked choke in the second round.[9]

On April 19, after McGregor tweeted a supposed retirement, the UFC announced that he was pulled from the event and a replacement for him was being sought. UFC President Dana White clarified that McGregor’s removal was related to his refusal to come to a press conference that week, because “he was in Iceland training and didn’t want to ruin his preparation for the fight”.[10] McGregor released a statement two days later, claiming he was not retired and that he requested the UFC to allow him to focus more on the fight preparation this time, as he felt he lost his focus during the media obligations for the previous fight. He then stated that he was ready for the event and would come for a scheduled New York press conference, but if that’s not enough, he “doesn’t know what to say”.[11] A report later claimed that the UFC decided to cancel the fight indeed, in what was rumored to be a $10 million paycheck for McGregor.[12]

On April 27, the UFC officially announced the new headliner as a UFC Light Heavyweight Championship unification rematch between current champion Daniel Cormier and former champion Jon Jones, who is also the current interim champion.[13] The pairing met previously at UFC 182 in January 2015 with Jones defending his title via unanimous decision.[14] Subsequent to that victory, Jones was stripped of the title and suspended indefinitely from the UFC in connection with a hit-and-run incident that he was involved in.[15] Cormier replaced him and went on to defeat Anthony Johnson at UFC 187 to win the vacant title.[16] Their rematch was originally expected to take place at UFC 197, but Cormier pulled out three weeks before the event due to injury and was replaced by Ovince Saint Preux, in what became an interim title bout.[17] Jones went on to defeat Saint Preux by unanimous decision and won the interim title.[18]

The event suffered another major hit only three days before it happened, as it was announced that Jones was pulled out by USADA due to a potential Anti-Doping Policy violation stemming from an out-of-competition sample collection on June 16. Cormier declared he would still fight if an opponent brought to him “made sense”. Additional information on Jones’ situation will be provided as the process moves forward.[19] A day later Jones apologized for the incident, but denied knowingly taking any illegal substance. He and his manager also declined to specify the substance that resulted in the failed test.[20] His “B” sample also came positive for the same substances and Jones’ faces a potential two-year suspension.[21]

During the UFC Fight Night: dos Anjos vs. Alvarez broadcast, it was announced that former UFC Middleweight Champion Anderson Silva would replace Jones on less than two days notice and face Cormier in a three-round non-title light heavyweight bout.[22]

Due to those major changes, the already scheduled UFC Women’s Bantamweight Championship bout between then champion Miesha Tate and top contender Amanda Nunes was revealed as the new main event.[22][23]

On June 4, a few hours before the UFC 199 event, MMAFighting.com reporter Ariel Helwani broke the news that former UFC Heavyweight Champion Brock Lesnar was close to finalizing deal to return at this event, despite being active in the WWE. The UFC confirmed the report, via a teaser video clip on the UFC 199 main card broadcast.[24] However, Helwani’s news scoop earned him a prompt physical ejection from the event venue and a lifetime ban from covering future UFC live events.[25] The organization faced a major backlash from the media community as well as fans,[26] before reinstating Helwani’s media credentials. They also stated that it was their belief “recurring tactics used” by Helwani “extended beyond the purpose of journalism”, a statement that MMAFighting.com disagreed with.[27]

Lesnar faced the 2001 K-1 World Grand Prix winner and former interim title contender Mark Hunt.[28] Due to Jones’ removal from the card, this bout was briefly promoted as the new main event. However, after the Tate-Nunes bout was announced as the new headliner, Lesnar-Hunt was once again confirmed as the co-main event.[22] Lesnar also headlined UFC 100 and with Jones’ absence, he and Jim Miller remained as the only two fighters to compete at both milestone events.

Due to McGregor’s experiments outside of his division, an interim UFC Featherweight Championship bout between former champion José Aldo and former lightweight champion Frankie Edgar took place at this event.[7] It was a rematch, as Aldo previously defended his title against Edgar at UFC 156 in 2013 via unanimous decision.[29]

The main card opened with a heavyweight bout between former two-time champion Cain Velasquez and Travis Browne.[30]

The featured bout of the preliminary card was a women’s bantamweight contest between former title challenger Cat Zingano and The Ultimate Fighter: Team Rousey vs. Team Tate winner Julianna Peña.[31] A few other bouts were also part of the Fox Sports 1 televised prelims:

  • a welterweight bout between former UFC Welterweight Champion Johny Hendricks and The Ultimate Fighter: Team Jones vs. Team Sonnen winner Kelvin Gastelum.[32]
  • a bantamweight rematch between former UFC Bantamweight Champion T.J. Dillashaw and Raphael Assunção.[33] The pairing first met at UFC Fight Night: Maia vs. Shields in October 2013, when Assunção won a close bout via split decision.[34]
  • Opening that portion of the event in the lightweight division was a bout between Sage Northcutt and Enrique Marín.[35]

A lightweight bout between Joe Lauzon and The Ultimate Fighter 1 winner and former lightweight title challenger Diego Sanchez was originally booked for UFC 180. However, the bout was cancelled due to both fighters being injured.[36] The fight was later rescheduled for this event and headlined the UFC Fight Pass preliminary card.[37]

A middleweight bout between former Strikeforce Light Heavyweight Champion Gegard Mousasi and Derek Brunson was expected to take place at the event, but on June 19 it was announced that Brunson pulled out due to injury and was replaced by Thiago Santos.[38][39]

UFC 200 Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Women’s Bantamweight Amanda Nunes def. Miesha Tate (c) Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 3:16 [a]
Heavyweight Brock Lesnar def. Mark Hunt Decision (unanimous) (29-27, 29-27, 29-27) 3 5:00
Light Heavyweight Daniel Cormier (c) def. Anderson Silva Decision (unanimous) (30-26, 30-26, 30-26) 3 5:00 [b]
Featherweight José Aldo def. Frankie Edgar Decision (unanimous) (49-46, 49-46, 48-47) 5 5:00 [c]
Heavyweight Cain Velasquez def. Travis Browne TKO (punches) 1 4:57
Preliminary Card (Fox Sports 1)
Women’s Bantamweight Julianna Peña def. Cat Zingano Decision (unanimous) (29-28, 29-28, 29-28) 3 5:00
Catchweight (171.25 lbs) Kelvin Gastelum def. Johny Hendricks Decision (unanimous) (29-28, 30-27, 30-27) 3 5:00
Bantamweight T.J. Dillashaw def. Raphael Assunção Decision (unanimous) (30-27, 30-27, 30-27) 3 5:00
Lightweight Sage Northcutt def. Enrique Marín Decision (unanimous) (29-28, 29-28, 29-28) 3 5:00
Preliminary Card (UFC Fight Pass)
Lightweight Joe Lauzon def. Diego Sanchez TKO (punches) 1 1:26
Middleweight Gegard Mousasi def. Thiago Santos TKO (punches) 1 4:32
Lightweight Jim Miller def. Takanori Gomi TKO (punches) 1 2:18

 

UFC 58 USA vs. Canada

UFC 58 – USA vs. Canada

UFC 58 – USA vs. Canada

UFC 58 USA vs. Canada

UFC 58

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 58: USA vs. Canada was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on March 4, 2006. It was held at the Mandalay Bay Events Center on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, and broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States.

In keeping with the theme of the card, most of the fights featured an American fighter against a Canadian fighter.

Five of the seven Canadian fighters featured, Icho Larenas, Sam Stout, Mark Hominick, Georges St-Pierre, and David Loiseau, were at the time champions in the Canadian TKO Major League MMA promotion.

The show drew a live gate of $1,758,450.[3] The disclosed fighter payroll for UFC 58 was $207,000.[4]

The final scorecard for United States vs. Canada was United States 5, Canada 3.

This event also featured the return of the lightweight division to the UFC, which had been suspended since UFC 49

RESULTS SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Middleweight Rich Franklin (c) def. David Loiseau Decision (unanimous) (50–43, 50–43, 50–42) 5 5:00 [a]
Middleweight Mike Swick def. Steve Vigneault Submission (guillotine choke) 1 2:09
Welterweight Georges St. Pierre def. B.J. Penn Decision (split) (29–28, 28–29, 29–28) 3 5:00
Middleweight Nate Marquardt def. Joe Doerksen Decision (unanimous) (30–27, 30–27, 30–27) 3 5:00
Lightweight Mark Hominick def. Yves Edwards Submission (triangle armbar) 2 1:52
Preliminary Card
Lightweight Sam Stout def. Spencer Fisher Decision (split) (29–28, 29–28, 28–29) 3 5:00 [b]
Light Heavyweight Jason Lambert def. Rob MacDonald Submission (kimura) 1 1:54
Heavyweight Tom Murphy def. Icho Larenas TKO (punches) 3 1:59 [c]
  1.  For the UFC Middleweight Championship
  2.  Fisher was a late replacement for Kenny Florian, who got injured during training for this fight. This was the UFC’s first lightweight match since the division was suspended in 2004.
  3.  Larenas was a late substitute for Kristof Midoux.
UFC on Fox 20 Holm vs Shevchenko

UFC on FOX 20: Valentina Shevchenko vs. Holly Holm

UFC on FOX 20: Valentina Shevchenko vs. Holly Holm

UFC on Fox 20 Holm vs Shevchenko

UFC on Fox 20

Early Prelims

Main Event

part 1


part 2


HISTORY

UFC on Fox: Holm vs. Shevchenko (also known as UFC on Fox 20) was a mixed martial arts event produced by the Ultimate Fighting Championship held on July 23, 2016 at United Center in Chicago, Illinois.[2]

The event was headlined by a women’s bantamweight bout between former UFC Women’s Bantamweight Champion Holly Holm and multiple-time Muay Thai world champion Valentina Shevchenko.[3]

A bout between former UFC Light Heavyweight Championship challengers Anthony Johnson and Glover Teixeira was expected to serve as the co-main event. However, Johnson pulled out on June 18 to tend to personal issues.[4] In turn, promotion officials elected to pull Teixeira from the card and the pairing was left intact and rescheduled to take place four weeks later at UFC 202.[5][6][7]

Ryan LaFlare was expected to face Alexander Yakovlev at the event. However, LaFlare was removed from the fight in early June after sustaining an undisclosed injury and was replaced by The Ultimate Fighter: American Top Team vs. Blackzilians winner Kamaru Usman.[8]

Tony Martin was expected to face Michel Prazeres at the event. However, Martin pulled out on July 6 due to a neck injury and was replaced by promotional newcomer J.C. Cottrell.[9]

George Sullivan was expected to face Héctor Urbina, but was pulled from the event due to a “potential compliance issue” with the UFC’s anti-doping policy stemming from “voluntarily disclosed information” he provided to USADA. Urbina still weighed in as a potential backup opponent should there be a need for him to compete in another bout. Since that did not materialize, he will be re-booked for another card in the near future.[10]

Results SPOILER

Main Card (Fox)
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Women’s Bantamweight Valentina Shevchenko def. Holly Holm Decision (unanimous) (49-46, 49-46, 49-46) 5 5:00
Lightweight Edson Barboza def. Gilbert Melendez Decision (unanimous) (30-27, 30-27, 29-28) 3 5:00
Heavyweight Francis Ngannou def. Bojan Mihajlović TKO (punches) 1 1:34
Women’s Strawweight Felice Herrig def. Kailin Curran Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 1:59
Preliminary Card (Fox)
Bantamweight Eddie Wineland def. Frankie Saenz TKO (punches) 3 1:54
Featherweight Darren Elkins def. Godofredo Pepey Decision (unanimous) (29-27, 29-27, 30-26) 3 5:00
Welterweight Kamaru Usman def. Alexander Yakovlev Decision (unanimous) (30-25, 30-25, 30-25) 3 5:00
Lightweight Michel Prazeres def. J.C. Cottrell Decision (unanimous) (30-26, 30-27, 30-27) 3 5:00
Preliminary Card (UFC Fight Pass)
Welterweight Alex Oliveira def. James Moontasri Decision (unanimous) (30-26, 30-26, 30-25) 3 5:00
Featherweight Jason Knight def. Jim Alers Decision (split) (29-28, 28-29, 29-28) 3 5:00
Heavyweight Luis Henrique def. Dmitry Smoliakov Submission (rear-naked choke)
UFC 57 Liddell vs. Couture 3

UFC 57 – Liddell vs. Couture 3

UFC 57 – Liddell vs. Couture 3

UFC 57 Liddell vs. Couture 3

UFC 57

part 1

part 2


HISTORY

UFC 57: Liddell vs. Couture 3 was a mixed martial arts event held by the Ultimate Fighting Championship on February 4, 2006. It was held at the Mandalay Bay Events Center on the Las Vegas Strip in Nevada, and broadcast live on pay-per-view in the United States.

Headlining the card was an anticipated rubber match between top UFC stars and former coaches of The Ultimate Fighter Chuck Liddell and Randy Couture, widely touted and marketed as MMA’s first major trilogy.

It was the UFC’s largest grossing gate to date, $3.3 million,[1] in addition to an estimate of over 400,000 pay-per-view buys. The disclosed fighter payroll for the event was $667,000.[3]

Results SPOILER

Main Card
Weight class Method Round Time Notes
Light Heavyweight Chuck Liddell (c) def. Randy Couture KO (punches) 2 1:28 [a]
Heavyweight Brandon Vera def. Justin Eilers KO (head kick and knee) 1 1:25
Heavyweight Marcio Cruz def. Frank Mir TKO (punches and elbows) 1 4:10
Light Heavyweight Renato Sobral def. Mike Van Arsdale Submission (rear-naked choke) 1 2:21
Welterweight Joe Riggs def. Nick Diaz Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 29–28, 30–27) 3 5:00
Preliminary Card
Light Heavyweight Alessio Sakara def. Elvis Sinosic Decision (unanimous) (29–25, 29–26, 29–26) 3 5:00 [b]
Heavyweight Paul Buentello def. Gilbert Aldana TKO (punches) 2 2:27
Heavyweight Jeff Monson def. Branden Lee Hinkle Technical Submission (north-south choke) 1 4:35
Light Heavyweight Keith Jardine def. Mike Whitehead Decision (unanimous) (29–28, 29–28, 29–28) 3 5:00 [c]